shichahn: (Rivers x chimp otp)
What happens when you take the ideas behind 28 Days and 28 Days Later, combine them, and replace the cast with turtles? This RP!

Oh, and [livejournal.com profile] miokohagata plays William, [livejournal.com profile] rsiasta plays Rob (aka Jaques), and I play Antonia.

Chapter 1: )
shichahn: (Rivers x chimp otp)
What happens when you take the ideas behind 28 Days and 28 Days Later, combine them, and replace the cast with turtles? This RP!

Oh, and [livejournal.com profile] miokohagata plays William, [livejournal.com profile] rsiasta plays Rob (aka Jaques), and I play Antonia.

Chapter 1: )
shichahn: (Psychonauts- Sasha Nein)
So at dinner today, Angela brought up the brilliant point that if a fisher can fish and a runner can run, then obviously, a finger can fing. After great discussion, we agreed that in fact all nouns ending in -er must have a verb form, which is the noun without the -er. A finger fings, a danger danges, a corner corns, a dinner dins, and so on. As in all types of grammar, there are exceptions to this rule, of course. A deer, for example, durs, and a career can carur. A seer, however, sees, because it is a two-syllable word.

So then we got to thinking: why would -er nouns be the only ones able to do this? -Or and -ar nouns should be able to be converted in this way as well. But first, we needed a precedent to prove that it can be done. After great thought, we realized that a jailor jails and a sailor sails; therefore, a monitor monits, a pastor pasts, and a chancellor chancells. The hardest to come up with was an -ar noun, but finally we found one in burglar, because burglars burgle and pulsars pulse. The difference here is that -ar nouns must be followed by an e in their verb form. Thus, a quasar can quase, a pear can pee, etc.

So in the interest of promoting these little-used words, we are going to use them in daily conversation now with the hope that they will in fact catch on. Feel free to do so yourselves!
shichahn: (Psychonauts- Sasha Nein)
So at dinner today, Angela brought up the brilliant point that if a fisher can fish and a runner can run, then obviously, a finger can fing. After great discussion, we agreed that in fact all nouns ending in -er must have a verb form, which is the noun without the -er. A finger fings, a danger danges, a corner corns, a dinner dins, and so on. As in all types of grammar, there are exceptions to this rule, of course. A deer, for example, durs, and a career can carur. A seer, however, sees, because it is a two-syllable word.

So then we got to thinking: why would -er nouns be the only ones able to do this? -Or and -ar nouns should be able to be converted in this way as well. But first, we needed a precedent to prove that it can be done. After great thought, we realized that a jailor jails and a sailor sails; therefore, a monitor monits, a pastor pasts, and a chancellor chancells. The hardest to come up with was an -ar noun, but finally we found one in burglar, because burglars burgle and pulsars pulse. The difference here is that -ar nouns must be followed by an e in their verb form. Thus, a quasar can quase, a pear can pee, etc.

So in the interest of promoting these little-used words, we are going to use them in daily conversation now with the hope that they will in fact catch on. Feel free to do so yourselves!

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May 2014

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